• <b>Federal Trade Commission - <a href=showcase/monopoly.html>View Pencasts on Monopoly</a></b>
  • <b>United States Federal Reserve - <a href=showcase/money.html>View Pencasts on Monetary Policy</a></b>
  • <b>United States Capitol - <a href=showcase/fiscal.html>View Pencasts on Fiscal Policy</a></b>
  • <b>United States Treasury - <a href=showcase/tax.html>View Pencasts on Tax Policy</a></b>
  • <b>U.S. Department of Commerce - <a href=showcase/measure.html>View Pencasts on Measuring Economic Activity</a></b>
  • <b>Home to the Bureau of Labor Statistics - <a href=showcase/labor.html>View Pencasts on Labor Markets</a></b>

Pencasts for Undergraduate Economics


Principles of Microeconomics


These Pencasts cover essential topics in a first-semester microeconomics course, appropriate for a first-year undergraduate course or advanced high school / advanced placement course. At most colleges and universities, this is a required course in business programs, economics majors, and is typically given general education credit for students of all majors. This course along with Principles of Macroeconomics builds foundations that are used throughout the economics curriculum. The focus in this course is how individual consumers and producers make optimal decisions, and examining the conditions under which private optimal decisions coincide with socially desirable outcomes, and when they do not.


Principles of Macroeconomics


These Pencasts cover essential topics in a first-semester microeconomics course, appropriate for a first-year undergraduate course or advanced high school / advanced placement course. At most colleges and universities, this is a required course in business programs, economics majors, and is typically given general education credit for students of all majors. This course along with Principles of Microeconomics builds foundations that are used throughout the economics curriculum. This course focuses on aggregate outcomes for an economy (eg: state-level or country-level economy), how production and spending is allocated among groups of economic agents, and what the implications are for aggregate prices, including prices for consumer goods, wages, and interest rates.



Intermediate Microeconomics


This course provides the theoretical framework for subsequent upper-level courses in microeconomics. In this course, models of consumer and producer behavior are developed so that students achieve a better understanding of how prices and quantities are determined in different market settings. Furthermore, the proper role of the government in markets is also a key part of the course. In most departments, this course focuses on the neoclassical model (optimizing consumers and producers). While the neoclassical view of consumer and producer behavior will be the focus, critiques of the neoclassical model will also be presented.



Intermediate Macroeconomics


Intermediate Macroeconomics provides a foundation for advanced courses in macroeconomics. It is a required course in the economics major at most universities. In recent years, methodological differences have emerged in intermediate macroeconomics textbooks and course offerings. The traditional approach included topics on long-run economic growth and explains short-run macroeconomic fluctuations and policy analysis with Keynesian models. A newer approach focuses on microeconomics foundations of macroeconomics models, which allows a discussion of supply-side issues next to demand-side problems in the context of general equilibrium models. There are pencasts here that address both of these treatments.



Labor Economics


This course investigates the behavior of workers and firms; understanding how workers and firms interact to determine wage rates and employment; and designing public policies that promote desirable labor-market outcomes. This course is typically an elective for most economics majors, but it is considered to be a core class in the field of microeconomics.



Money and Banking


This course emphasizes financial markets and the implications for macroeconomic stability. A central purpose is to form a foundation to understand monetary policy and economic policy governing financial markets. This is a core course in a macroeconomics track of an economics major. At some colleges and universities, this is a required course for the economics major, and in many others it is an elective course.